Author Archives: Mark Snoeberger

Ethics or Theological Subscription as the Ground of Functional Christian Fellowship?

A couple of weeks ago Union University made news by practicing secondary separation (or at least what fundamentalists have been pummeled over the last 70 years for practicing under that label): they broke fellowship with an organization of professing believers—the … Continue reading

Posted in Current Issues, Theology | Tagged , | 8 Comments

Homosexuality: What Believers May Rightly Hope from Their Government

I cannot compete with the vast onslaught of blog heavyweights who have all, it seems, trained their guns on last week’s SCOTUS decision. But I’d like to chip away at one question that seems to be less than fully addressed, … Continue reading

Posted in Current Issues, Theology | Tagged | 1 Comment

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 5)

Having laid out in the previous several posts what I believe may be commended as “received laws of language,” I would like to close this series with a practical look at a pair of difficult passages that stretch the limits of the … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 5 Comments

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 4d)

Having discussed two seminal axioms of language that seem to qualify as “received laws of language” (the Univocal Nature of Language and the Jurisdiction of Authorial Intent) and offering a qualification concerning the dual authorship of Scripture often raised by … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 4c)

Having established two axiomatic principles of language that govern the intelligible use of words (the Univocal Nature of Language and the Jurisdiction of Authorial Intent), we need to pause, I think, to make an important qualification—not so much a third … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 4b)

A second received law of language that may be deduced from common usage is the Jurisdiction of Authorial Intent. I proposed last week that a text can have but one signification in any given context; this week I suggest further that … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 4a)

We come now to the heart of this series, viz., a discovery of the “received laws of language” that we as humans unconsciously use every day as we engage in ordinary communication with one another. The material here is not … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 12 Comments

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 3)

This blog post is fairly ambitious, seeking to answer two questions: How can we prove the existence of universally “received laws of language”? And, assuming they exist, Who gets to decide what those laws are in the absence of an … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | 1 Comment

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 2)

When evaluating the truth or error of any proposed theological statement or system, there are two primary questions that the theologian asks: the question of correspondence and the question of coherence. In using these two terms, I am using two … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Whatever Happened to Literal Hermeneutics? (Part 1)

For decades it was assumed, by both sides of the debate between dispensational and Reformed theology, that the primary distinction between the two models (there were really no other viable evangelical options in the early days) was hermeneutical—dispensationalists held consistently … Continue reading

Posted in Theology | Tagged , | 4 Comments

A Coalition for the Advancement of Realized Eschatology?

This week the Gospel Coalition’s annual meeting features a panel discussion with panelists who reject the Gospel. On the face of things this seems to be out of step with TGC’s founding principles, which exalt commitment to the Gospel as … Continue reading

Posted in Current Issues, Theology | Tagged , | 8 Comments

What Shall We Do with Moses?

A couple of weeks back Bob Jones University made the news by apologizing for statements made a generation ago suggesting that homosexuals should be subjected, like they were during the Mosaic economy, to capital punishment. This mea culpa was a … Continue reading

Posted in Christian Living, Current Issues | Tagged | 1 Comment